Wednesday, November 07, 2007

Has Digital Finally Come Of Age?




I think maybe it has.

This thing for Orange, which I first saw on Faris's blog and which was created by Iain Tait's crew over at Poke, is simply awesome.

I know I hosted a piece by DDB creative Rob Messeter saying that most interactive work is "pony" and "puerile", and of course a lot of it is. But then most TV ads and posters are rubbish too.

I suspect it may take just one incredible piece of digital work to change the perception that above-the-line creatives have about on-line (after all, perception always lags behind reality). This site may be it.

Even the loading screen is cool - bees deliver globs of honey to fill up a pot until it reaches 100%.

And the site itself...

Well, I'm not going to say anything about it. I urge you to check it out.

But something that gets you engaging with a brand's promise and its tone for half an hour - an hour even - that's got to be more effective than a 30 second TV ad, doesn't it?

25 comments:

J said...

Cool website. And it actually communicates something relevant.

I think it's far more interesting and effective than the very much predictable tv ad.

Rob said...

very sweet.

good to see some decent online work getting the attention it deserves.

(and i never said puerile, just pony.)

Anonymous said...

The rest of this campaign is puerile though.

Lunar BBDO said...

You're right that most work in most media is pony, but BMW Films, Subservient Chicken and Nike Plus are three digital things that piss all over anything non-digital that was done in the same time. This proves that the medium has the right not to be dismissed.

This Orange thingie (lovely though it is) doesn't rip the whole rule book up like those things did, but as J said, it's way better than the comparable TV ads.

Anonymous said...

Do you think digital creatives care what above the line creatives think? You talk about the seperate disciplines like they're just waiting for your approval.

Rob Mortimer said...

Oh absolutely.
Its a wonderful site, brilliantly designed and thought out; and completely engaging for long periods of time.

Its taking up the "Name a good piece of communication you have seen recently" spot on my graduate applications.

Lunar - Isnt it a shame that we have to contrast them as such instead of seeing them as part of a team?

Anonymous said...

no rob, its fine to contrast them. its natural. its like saying, the starter was a bit overdone, but the main course was very tasty.

Lunar BBDO said...

Rob: We don't have to contrast anything.

And Anon 3.17: your use of 'they're' suggests you're an ATL creative. Do you think the digital creatives care about what you think?

Anonymous said...

lunarbbdo, I have worked at both online and above the line and now I work as neither. I think some digital creatives take on board what atl creatives say even when it is just stupidly negative and unconstructive. Rarely do you see digital creatives slagging off ATL work. I just hate the idea that atl creatives are sat waiting to be impressed by digital. If you were smart you wouldnt wait, you'd get on with doing it yourself

Lunar BBDO said...

Digital creatives don't have to take stupidly negative or unconstructive comments on board, and they wouldn't if they were truly confident in their medium. It sounds from your post as if there is uncertainty on both sides and, if so, surely Digital creatives are as much to blame as ATL's.

Anonymous said...

I dont think there's any uncertainty, why would there be, about what? From what I have experienced digital creatives are confident in their medium, that's why they work in digital. I dont see how they can be to blame for the idea that ATL creatives are waiting to have their perceptions changed about online.

Lunar BBDO said...

Surely if you take on board stupid comments then you are insecure (uncertain). If not then you don't care.

Why are they uncertain? God knows. I guess it's because they're a bunch of geeky bloody nerds who masturbate to Red Dwarf.

(Only kidding).

]-[appy Thought said...

You surprise me Scamp you really do. To find a repetitive website that randomly respawns the same little animated widget things over and over again a benchmark in digital advertising... I think Lunar BBDO posted 3 things that are a much better example of digital work over this instantly forgetable "microsite". Surely the idea of something being unlimited is that it has infinate posibilities? Not that it sould endlessly loop itself in a Groundhog day deja-vu hell?

Anonymous said...

lunarbbdo

You are very funny. You should work in advertising.

I agree with your point about taking on negative comments but I still dont think digital should be put in a position of trying to prove itself to above the line. If above the line creatives aren't already convinced by digital then they are way behind.

Anonymous said...

having worked in both traditional and digital over the years, i have a sneaking suspicion that the internet is becoming increasingly less friendly to advertising and it's getting harder and harder to reach people online as they corral themselves into social networks etc.

plus the content seems to be devolving into less and less interesting "things". first it was viral films that usually didn't go viral. then it became gimmicky online toys and widgets etc.

what i'm trying to say is that i don't think the internet isn't turning out to be much good for marketing mass market brands. it's a hard medium when you think about it in a big picture way.

anyone else feel the same? or do i just need to get some stronger weed?

Toad said...

As someone who works both sides of the fence: Digital creatives who work in the online arm of large offline shops are frequently the target of barbs from their offline confreres. Though much less so in the past year, as the general advertising guys realize that if they want to be working in 5 years, they're going to need online. And as the lines are blurring.

Creatives in digital only shops are often unaware of what offline creatives think of them, since they hardly ever encounter them.

10 years ago, digital creatives mostly worked in "online." Today, they work in "advertising."

Big change.

PS: And Lunar's right: it's a well done microsite. The equivalent of a nicely done billboard. (Or whatever you Brits call those giant postery things on the sides of highways. Which you don't even call highways but motorways or somesuch.)

Rob Mortimer said...

It seems much more than a microsite to me. For a start it has loads of different interactive things within it; including several games.

Yes it is effectively an online billboard; but calling it a microsite seems to belittle how good it is.

Toad said...

@Rob: Microsite is not a derogatory term. It just means a site that's ancillary to the brand's main site.

Rob Mortimer said...

Yeah, it just seems like a derogatory term! It implies less importance and less content...

:)

Anonymous said...

Like most vaguley interesting sites i spent 2 minutes on this, realised my computer couldn't handle it, then buggered off. Will i pass this on to my friends? No. Will i tell anyone about it? No.

Advertising is an unwanted interuption and digital's flaw is that it requires you to physically do something, (do you actually like typing in website addresses? i know i don't.)

TV and posters allow you to stay in your usual vegetated state, and as they are not free mediums, you accept them. Unless you find something personally rewarding/satisfying on the internet, there is not much point of making stuff like this, other than for having an online 'presence'.

S.

Anonymous said...

This site is nice. Nice art direction. Nice content. Nice. But here in the UK we've still got a mountain to climb before we can compete with the quality and quantity of digital work coming from the rest of the world - especially America (where it's the "traditional" agencies like Crispin, Goodby and BBH NY that are amonst the best digital exponents)

Anonymous said...

It engaged me for all of 30 seconds. They also didn't account for vertical widescreen monitors so it wasn't unlimited in my case (but that's pedantry) Beautifully executed otherwise but, meh.

Security Dog said...

It's twee, in a crisp way.

For those not ready for Home Star Runner.

Anonymous said...

the mini game feel of it is great - really engaging for younger users and those who wawnt to pass five minutes in the office. I like it - it's far better than the so called interactive websites many other brands are putting out there.

Anonymous said...

Think people should get over the trad / digital debate - this is what's truly puerile. Think we should consider how different media are best used together to communicate with people and start working more collaboratively to do interesting work. I don't think clients or the publc give a shit whether work is from Shoreditch, Soho or Miami.

I think this is pretty nice - quirky, takes you a little off guard, brightens the day for a couple of minutes. But I wonder how people who aren't reading ad blogs are going to find it - do you advertise the ad?

If I had the choice I'd rather Orange spent the money reducing my phone bill rather than trying to be (whatever they are trying to be these days) through interesting, though ultimately slightly pointless websites.