Monday, January 14, 2008

Who Needs Words?

Berocca, by JWT (click to enlarge image)



Harvey Nichols, by DDB London (click to enlarge)


Two new bits of print that gave me a tingle. What they have in common is they're both really clean. Cleanliness turns me on. Always has done.

22 comments:

Ad Broad, oldest working writer in advertising said...

Love these, Scamp. Even tho I'm a writer.

john dodds said...

Sorry - I gave them the cursory glance that a reader (as opposed to a creative director) would give them and I took away nothing other than one was an ad for berocca which I've heard of but know nothing about.

Cedric said...

@John Dodds:
When it comes to beer advertising, what would you like to know? That it is fresher, it is a stout, a lager... Ultimately there has been so many beer ads on these topics, that none of them stand out (and you have even more freedom in the UK than in France with our Evin's law). So I am tempted to say that the purpose/create a top of mind that will influence you once at the counter. At least this one has a brand attitude, even if it reminds me of a Pepsi ad from the 90s with a chimp. If they were to build on this territory they might on the longer term start owning a point of differentiation, be it in the tone of voice or the execution. Look at Red Bull's for instance who have opted for the cartoon execution too.

Anonymous said...

@ cedric

Yes, when it comes to beer advertising. But am I missing something? I was under the impression that Berocca is not a beer, but something else altogether. In which case, I'd have to side with John Dodds on this one, in that it leaves me wanting more. In fact, inadvertently, it would seem you're only proving his point.

Anonymous said...

@ cedric:
since when Red Bull is an example worth mentioning?
They're one of the best products with the worst advertising out there.

Anonymous said...

Who needs words?
ITV's campaign did.

kate moss said...

Cleanliness does not turn me on.

Dirtiness does.

Filthy poo and the like.

x

BTW: I like the Berocca ad. I often use Berocca to give my fiddle-dee-dee a tingle. Plink, plink fizz ; )

Anonymous said...

Cedric. Are you the son of Cyril Sneer, evil genius from popular late 80s animated series "The Racoons"?

Scamp said...

Yes, anonymous, the ITV campaign does have words. But only endlines (and programme info). No headlines or body copy so far.

I guess my POV is just that print ads should be visually-driven. I doubt that ALL words can be eliminated. The Harvey Nichols ad has an endline, and the name of the store. Even the Berocca ad has one word in it - 'Berocca'.

Maybe the 'Who Needs Words?' headline was inaccurate. Further proof that headlines are to be avoided...

Juan Cassock said...

I have a pet theory that John Hegarty is a secret dyslexic and his anti-copy stance is permeating through the creative department.
Berocca would work well as a postcard ad, but not as a press ad. It assumes too much prior knowledge (unless it's going in D+C, Vice etc)

john dodds said...

It boils down to our previous exchange about dailogue in advertisements. I totally agree with you about cleanliness (both visually and in terms of copy), the goal is to get an idea over simply but without dumbing-down and for me these two just didn't really do it.

@cedric I'm not saying you have to highlight a product attribute, but I do think it's important that you stimulate some product-related thought or emotion and these failed to do it for me. As for Red Bull, wasn't their whole marketing strategy originally predicated on not running ads but on associating themsleves with various lifestyle communities via sponsorship and events.

Cynical Rob said...

I hate 'em.

Sorry.

Sure they're clean, but so is my arse and no one gives that more than a passing glance [and I include my wife]

Your Audi ad pisses on both of these Scamp ...

Steve said...

Sorry, Scamp - I'm confused. Isn't 'Run, London' a headline. 'He writes it. They Live it' also a headline. Or am I missing something?

rjhayter said...

Scamp, you wrote: "Yes, anonymous, the ITV campaign does have words. But only endlines (and programme info). No headlines or body copy so far."

What about the press ads that I saw several times over the weekend – "This is how (er, something, can't remember, sorry. Was it "ITV"?) feels" with copy that was without a shadow of a doubt, 'body copy' wrapped around programme info? And rainbows. Mustn't forget the rainbows.

I'm with you on the Berocca ad, though. Less keen on the Harvey Nicks. 'Baked Beans' was much much better.

Scamp said...

You're quite right, Run London is a headline. I think 'he writes it they live it' is actually an endline, but that's just semantics. The important point here is to do as I say, not as I do...

Anonymous said...

Yes the Berocca ad is cool.

No need for words, and apparently no need for art direction either. Why always spend thousands of pounds on a top illustrator when you can just run the scamps from the first client presentation.

But it works.

rjhayter said...

"The important point here is to do as I say, not as I do..."

Scamp, you've done it. You're a Creative Director!

Anonymous said...

be curious to know what joe average thinks of them. or if he can be bothered to make sense of them.

why is it that UK advertising is so bereft of emotion? why is there so much clinical stuff? everything (that gets awarded) seems to feel the same. reductive and overcrafted. i was reading the campaign press awards and was struck by lack of humanity.

Hickesy said...

Juan Cassock 10.26 am has sussed you Scamp. You're just trotting out the BBH mantra. Words allow people to conjure up their own images, rather than one chosen for them. Eminently more powerful. (But then I would say that).

Lunar BBDO said...

Can I be ever so picky and say that the HN ad requires a line that splits the axes at 45 degrees. Otherwise it says nothing. You could plot a line that shoots up steeply to suggest that great shoes=pull ugly bloke or a shallow line that means crap shoes can pull a 'hunk'.

And I was shit at maths at school (but I can do the numbers round of Countdown).

Anonymous said...

I agree with above. And I thought I was the only one. x

Rob Mortimer said...

Not the best examples, but I do like it when ads treat people with enough intelligence to work it out.

Jokes/humour/thoughts are so much more rewarding when they are a reward for thought.