Tuesday, August 05, 2008

Tuesday Tip No.58 - Beat The Finger


Your enemy

If you are a junior team looking for a job, your biggest enemy is the Creative Director's finger.

When he is looking at your book, if his brain doesn't very quickly understand an idea, his finger will flip to the next page. And your creative brilliance will be lost.

The sad fact is that when he's looking at books, a Creative Director's finger works faster than his brain.

He's short of time, and has a lot of other things on his mind. He hasn't got the time or patience to decode ads that are hard to decode. And actually that's not a bad thing. He doesn't want to hire teams who write ads that the public will find hard to decode.

But if you want him to hire you, you need to beat the finger. You need to do everything you can to make sure that your idea has been understood before his finger flips to the next page. (Or in the case of a digital portfolio, clicks).

If his brain hesitates or is confused, his finger will activate.

Here's 10 suggestions to stop that happening:

1) Be arresting. A book isn't real life. In real life it may be worth doing a long copy ad for cross-tracks. In your book it isn't.

2) Leave out all extraneous stuff like what the brief was, what student awards this ad won. They just slow down the communication.

3) Leave space between each campaign. Like a blank page. Don't have him thinking for even 1/10 of a second that the first ad in your campaign for lawnmowers is another ad in your campaign for a chocolate bar. This will only confuse.

4) All drawings must be crystal clear. It doesn't matter if they're hand-drawn or mac'd up, all that matters is they're quick to understand. If a CD pauses, it should be because he's stunned by the brilliance of your strategy. Not because he's trying to work out whether your drawing is a dog, a cat, or a car.

5) Dialogue that accompanies TV scripts. It just looks like it will take a lot of time to read. Maybe you come upon a CD with time on his hands, and he reads it, and loves it. Maybe you don't, and he just flips. Why risk it?

6) Logos. Use the brands' real logos. Why? Because they're marginally quicker to take in than hand-drawn ones.

7) Got ambient work in your book (I hope you do)? If it's not abundantly clear that it's an ambient ad, then don't be afraid to write 'AMBIENT' in big letters at the top. A few fractions of a second in which the CD is trying to work out whether a picture in front of him is for a print ad or an ambient ad are a few fractions of a second too many.

8) That's all I've got. It was shorter than 10. Make your book flow as quickly and smoothly as possible. That finger flips fast. Make sure your ideas are faster.


Previous Tips:

How To Know If You've Had An Idea; How To Use Social Media; How To Get The Best Out Of Directors; Don't Write Ads, Write Strategies; How To Choose Where To Work; Working Outside London; What Would John Webster Do?; What Would Paul & Nigel Do?; The Hidden Flaw; How To Write Copy; Be Funny All The Way Through; How To Do Virals; How To Negotiate Your Salary; How To Get A Pay Rise; Be Wary Of Punding; Challenge The Brief; Tell The Truth; Playing To Lose; How To Write Headlines; How To Do Direct; How To Do Radio; How To Do Press; How To Do TV; How To Do Digital; How To Do Posters; Look At Weird Shit; Why You Shouldn't Present To The Client; How To Present To Clients If You Have To; Presenting To The Team; Presenting To The Creative Director; How To Deal With Rejection; Look Creative; Don't Be Afraid To Ask; Your Idea Has To Be 120%; Read Iain's Tips; Don't Behave; How To Discuss Ideas; Read Hugh's Tips; How To Get A Job In Advertising Part IV - How To Turn A Placement Into A Job; How To Turn A Placement Into A Job (Ed Morris view); How To Get A Job In Advertising Part III - How To Approach Agencies (re-print of Tip No. 7); How To Get A Job In Advertising Part II - How To Put A Book Together; How To Get A Job In Advertising Part I - FAQ; Make Friends With Traffic; Get Reference; Don't Stop Too Soon; Be Very; Breaking Up; Working Well With Your Partner; Finding The Right Partner; How To Approach Agencies; Never-Seen-Before Footage; Dicketts' Finger; Two Blokes In The Pub; Play Family Fortunes; Should You Take A Bad Job?; Don't Overpolish

112 comments:

Anonymous said...

9. Don't be caught dead saying you like shitty ads on your blog. That's a freebie, Wal.

Anonymous said...

As a junior creative who's 2 years in to the luxury of actually having a job, I'd suggest that the above ideas are well worth following for presenting real work to your CD/ planning team/ account handlers/ other creatives.

They don't take kindly to junior gibbering.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Luke and Wilf said...

Another piece of great info, its helped us out alot with our book.

4am said...

as a CD in a large agency that sees lots of placement teams, I'd say pretend you're children. ie. seen and not heard. let the book do the talking.

Anonymous said...

re 4am.

I can't remember the name of your little agency, but I'm sure as hell glad I never worked for you when I was a junior.

4am said...

how do you know you didn't?

Wal said...

this is especially true at events like cream/shelf/new blood. there are dozens of portfolio so your book has to be faster then light if you want to stand any chance.

great advice, and a good metaphor, beat the finger.

Anonymous said...

Can't get your censorship criteria Scamp. It looked to me as a direct quote. Or is it that you find Wal liking that ad offensive?

PH said...

I agree with every point except the first. If the CD is a writer, surely they'll be professionally interested in any long copy ads. Also, from personal experience, literary skills tend to be very poor in some junior teams. Knowing that at least one of them can put together something other than formulaic image-led ads would be a bonus in my book.

brake dollinge said...

meh. I don't like these rules.

I remember being told over and over again 'no-one's ever going to read that'. hang on, I used to think, I'm trying to get a job as a fucking copywriter here. it's like telling someone the wall they're trying to build is 'a bit bricky'.

I'd much rather see something surprising expressed in the best way possible than something that's designed specifically to appeal to a goldfish, even if it might take me a couple of sips of coffee to get my head round.

I wunt go and see a creative director, anyway. I'd go and see a middle-senior team with more than a nanosecond on their hands, get a proper crit. 9 out of 10 junior jobs come through placements, which CDs rarely dirty their hands with.

so there.

Anonymous said...

PH, they should be but I also should shit diamonds and sadly, I don't.

The reality is, your best bet is a purely visual book with strong strategies.

Anonymous said...

"9 out of 10 junior jobs come through placements" says who?

I don't buy it. Don't think Wally buys it either.

Anonymous said...

Ignore this, juniors. If you've written a great long copy ad or a brilliant TV script, show it. If it's shit, don't show it. Don't assume some tortured visual pun is going to go down better, just because there are no words in it.

Anonymous said...

cheers for adding a strapline to the blog there Wal. Sure you shouldn't be the writer?

great advice, and a good metaphor, smell my finger.

Anonymous said...

"I'd go and see a middle-senior team with more than a nanosecond on their hands"
Ha ha ha ha ha ha. Good one.
How many middle/senior teams do you know with ANY time on their hands let alone a nano second.
Not these days.
These days it's "Just put some words on a bit of paper because we have a review in three hours!" No one cares if the ad is any good or not as long as there are bits of paper with ink on that people can say are crap for the meeting. The meeting is more important than the ads in it.
I'm right and if you think I'm wrong, you're actually wrong.

Anonymous said...

Books are shite.

Hire people. People can learn. Books can be stolen.

Anonymous said...

Anon 1:54, You're being naive there. ANY good ad is better than a SHIT ad. Visual or copy.

The keyword here is time. A CD only has a limited amount of time to see your book. If you make them waste 5 minutes reading your prose and turns out to be bad you've lost his time and probably pissed him off.

If you do a shit visual ad, he will basically turn the page. No time wasting.

If you get the CD is basically YOUR TARGET. A fluid book shows good understanding on how is best to approach people depending on the situation.

Rachel and Debbie said...

Re: Anon 1.57

I'd say your half right, you've got more chance of seeing a senior team (more likely to know whats happening with placements) than a CD but yep they still have virtually no time on their hands and need the quickest book or scrap piece of paper full of ideas to look at.

A picture is worth a thousand words.

Anonymous said...

Wal, dunno who you're trying to please at Fallon but you don't have a clue mate.

Anonymous said...

2:11 PM And a clichéd phrase is worthless.

brake dollinge said...

well, 1.51, in eleven years I've only ever known one team get hired on the strength of their book alone.

and 1.57, if they haven't got time, they should have have the courtesy to postpone the crit until they have (sorry that meeting didn't go well, dude).

and 'a picture is worth a thousand words' is not only arrant nonsense, but the sort of arrant nonsense that means I spend half my time pointing out that junior teams have spelt 'bus' wrong.

Scamp said...

To Anon 1.33, and your question about my censorship criteria - there was indeed nothing wrong with your direct quote. It was the bit you wrote before that, and your overall intention, that fell foul of "Comments that are more abusive and offensive than they are witty aren't allowed."

To everyone who is slagging off Wal - you do realise that you are helping to make him the best-known junior Creative in London, don't you?

Scamp said...

Maybe teams get hired off placement not book. But how do you get a placement? Your book. So make book good. Quick is good.

Anonymous said...

there's less than a thousand words in your post rachel and debs. go find the picture that puts your argument across.

50p said...

re wally

scamp don't you mean infamous?

Anonymous said...

Wal is a man?!?!?!?!

brake dollinge said...

quick is inherently good if you're breeding racehorses or waiting for transplant organs.

otherwise, good is good.

the quest for the ultimate quick-hit book means that nothing's got any depth or character. the last cream show was like a forgettable episode about two-thirds through the x-factor.

Anonymous said...

that's where you go wrong, Scamp.
No need to slag him off to make him famous. He's already well known for his endless placement tour.

What is it Wal, 10,15 agencies now?

Anonymous said...

it's true that if a creative director hasn't got time to look at something good with depth, he's a bit of charlie.

ben said...

When we say yes to a book crit we put aside half an hour and talk to the team about where they've been, where they want to go and how to improve their book.

Personality is important, too. We'd never get anyone in to work here without meeting them and liking them.

For what it's worth, we also like to see evidence of non-advertising creative interests (quite a common thing in books these days).

Anonymous said...

The 'non advertising' thing is a myth.

Apart from W&K, Nitro, H&D and you Ben (one of our most useful crits back in the day) we had nothing but abuse for anything that wasn't a classic execution.

Ed Morris told us that what we did wasn't advertising and to basically get out and never darken his door again. As did Mother. A lot of agencies are incredibly closed minded when it comes to 360.

Anonymous said...

Isn't that Ben from Mother?

Anonymous said...

Yeah, such a common thing it's boring really. And the fact you came up with the idea for an automatic wanking glove, doesn't mean you can make good ads. (See mandy and sarah at W+K).

Lateral thinking is good. Having exotic shit on the book just for the sake of it, is completely bollocks.

I want to see if an architect has to put up with that. 'Great building's, Peter but it's too architecture. Can you show us something else?'

Anonymous said...

I meant Ben from BBH. This is getting confusing.

Anonymous said...

"As did Mother"

Really? They're so much into artsy fartsy shit that I'd think they'd be keen on it.

Some colleagues used to joke that if you want Mother to like your book all you have to do is remove the layout borders from print executions. They'll think it's ambient.

Anyway, they can't do anything but telly and hand over cheques to Shame Meadows so you're probably better off somewhere else.

Anonymous said...

We once got a placement because the creative team used to go to the same Manchester local as my Art Director. Our book was shit but we made them laugh.

Anonymous said...

To the anon referring to Ed Morris.
Aside from that, was that a good crit at all?

Mark said...

> 3:41 PM
And you wonder why 99% of the ads are shit. Question, did you do asda or orange?

Anonymous said...

'creative directors are pushed for time'
honestly, are they? no one is that busy.
their jobs are so completely useless beyond saying 'yes' or 'no' to things.
i think the test is this-
who would you be more concerned about if they were 'pushed for time'; a paramedic or a creative director?
it's just a fucking job and a pretty unimportant one at that.

Anonymous said...

I understand wanting to see a mid or senior team as they've got more time. But is it a crit you're after or a job? I'd want to see the person that can hire me that day.

Anonymous said...

Anon, 3:41 PM you are a disgrace.

Anonymous said...

The thing with that anon 3:49 PM, you only get one shot. Wouldn't you rather see someone who points out most of the flaws your ads have before the man himself sees you?

If you think you're ready aim high. But remember, it's very unlikely that more than a shot. Two if he's really generous. Just ask wally.

Anonymous said...

i'd love to go to mother with a list of ads with the cult of personality used to sell the product.

like to see them have the gall to criticise any of it.

Bias said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
fallon junior said...

I wouldn't hesitate to try and get in touch with juniors first. We already have jobs and could tell you what we did to get them. Juniors are much easier to impress too.

As a general rule, don't come here with a book full of adverts. We're not big on ads. Show us something else. Something powerful, something human. And please, leave the know-it-all attitude at the front door.

Anonymous said...

Anon at 2.10pm

Every long copy ad is a series of short copy ads. The headline needs to hook you into the first sentence. The first sentence needs to hook you into the second.

No CD will "waste five minutes of their time" reading a shit long copy ad, because they'll know it's shit within seconds.

So: don't worry about whether your book is 'quick' or 'slow'. Just put your best work in, give it some pace and variety, and if it's good and if the CD isn't a fuckwit, you'll get a job.

Anonymous said...

From 3:41 PM

At least we knew we were shit. It made us work extremely hard to de-shitify ourselves.

Scamp said...

I'm not really talking about crits. I'm talking about when the CD looks at your book, after it's been recommended to him by a senior team, or by whoever looks after placements. You're not there.

Maybe the team that recommended you is there, maybe they're not. Maybe there are six books there.

He won't read the long copy. Maybe he should but he won't, if there are five other books waiting.

Anonymous said...

You're right. They won't read it but they'll pretend they are. Being polite. For 5 minutes. And that means a shitty ad has cost you 5 minutes with a CD.

And since a long copy ad is a series of small ads if your ad is not great, you can multiply that for as many lines your long copy ad has.

A bad visual pun is still just one ad. He'll turn the page and will forget about it if the next one is good.

Not to mention it takes less time to craft a visual ad than a bejeweled narrative turd.

Anonymous said...

CDs can't read long copy.
Their attention span has been trained to ignore any amount of text longer than that on shemale stickers in Soho's photo booths.

Anonymous said...

Hahaha.
You probably don't want to know where that finger's been.

Anonymous said...

fallon junior, you sound like a know-it-all yourself mate.

I'd stay clear off juniors. From what I've heard specially Fallon's.

Anonymous said...

I'm a junior and even I admit that I give shit crits.

However, junior's are good sources of names and numbers for far better teams. So visit them all and steal their address books.

Anonymous said...

can we go visit you then?
which agency?

Anonymous said...

Having looked after placements for a few years at a big agency, and in the case of our own hiring as juniors, the ECD barely even looked at student books. The middleweight/senior placement team got us in on placement (after liking our book and not thinking we were dicks), and after that we cracked a load of live briefs (all the shit work, but work that had to be done) and showed work to as many of the teams (at all levels) as we could, until practically all of them had recommended us to ECD for a job. If you're indispensable to the department as a whole (and traffic, and account teams) and there's cash, you'll get hired.

Another point is that, if you can, try to get another job offer (even if it's somewhere you don't want to work, while you're on placement somewhere good) Make time in addition to the placement, there's always more. Send other ECDs work, ask them to set you live briefs and send work in, just get out there and use your brain. It's about manipulating the right people, striking up the right relationships and learning about the industry.

Whilst Scamp's rules are generally correct, it's about not being a cockmuncher and having a bit of talent, common-sense and luck. And probably sucking off a few people, but that's another story...

To every employed creative who reads this blog this comment is total "grandmother sucking eggs" stuff, but some of the feckless numpties who come into see us with the whole "we've been on placement for 900 years nonsense" just don't seem to get it...

Fuck that's a long comment...

Anonymous said...

OK, I'll say it one more time for the slow of thinking.

A good long copy ad is a series of good short copy ads.

A CD will read a good long copy ad, because that's what makes it a good long copy ad.

He'll glance at the headline and think, hmm, that's pretty good. Then he'll read the first sentence and think, actually, this is brilliant. By the end, he'll be working out what salary to offer you and cursing all those self-regarding visual puns he's had to trawl through recently.

This is all assuming it's a brilliant ad, of course. But that's the point: include it if it's good; don't include it if it's shit. Same as it's always been.

Anonymous said...

You're right. Except he won't read it.
Full stop.

Anonymous said...

I see it's a slow day at DDB.

Anonymous said...

To 4.42 PM

Of course. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to mention my agency name on here but if you have a website/ blog/ contact details post them up and I'll give you a shout so you can pop by for a shit crit next week.

Anonymous said...

why wouldn't you be allowed?
that's silly. your comments are anonymous anyway so you don't have to worry about any shit you've written in the past. Unless you're one of those wankers bigging up their own shite. Otherwise I don't see what the problem is.

Anonymous said...

is it you ali?

Sell! Sell! said...

Crits-wise it's more helpful to either go see a junior team fresh in to their job (first year), or a very senior team.
The juniors can help you because they've just done it - and as has been said they'll have lots of up-to-date contacts of good people to see that helped them.
The seniors can help you out improving your book, and will more often than not be able to pass you on to the CD if they think you're good enough.
Middleweight teams generally are less helpful and more harsh in an unhelpful way (they're just passing on their own experiences).
Of course, that's a generalisation.
If in doubt, always aim for the CD and see the person they pass you on to.

Wal said...

i actually imagine busy creatives reading long copy/looking at complicated stuff if done right. that is if you don't put it first, and have a uber good (and quick) first campaign to catch this persons attention and make him curious and willing to spend time on the more complicated stuff. oh and it has to be good.

oh and to anonymous 3.00pm, we've done three placements so far as a team.

Anonymous said...

Wal, 3 placements? Good try.

Anonymous said...

And kate moss is a virgin.

Anonymous said...

Nerver mind Scamp's list (a creative director himself). Wal and a fallon junior are sharing their wisdom.

Wal said...

i had a couple before with my old partner, you can't just find a new one and get hired straight away.

paris said...

I've only done it twice.
Up the arse.

Anonymous said...

It's a good thing you have a detailed record on your blog wal.

Anonymous said...

http://www.brandrepublic.com/Campaign/News/836746/Fallons-Shane-Meadows-ad-Asda-released/

Scamp said...

Now I've finally seen it, I'm wondering why everyone was getting so excited either for or against. It's just a very normal advert, isn't it?

Rachel and Debbie said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

exactly, scamp.
The thing is you wouldn't expect a 'normal' ad from arguably the best agency in town and one of the best directors in Britain. Even if it's for Asda. How did Meadows agreed is beyond me.

Blame the client all you want but what about this new Orange ad. Same agency, great director, great client, same outcome: wallpaper.

Anonymous said...

I agree, normal falls short.

the golden oracle of truth said...

Asda could have been done by any agency in town, including Grey on an off day.

Orange could have been done by anyone down to about MCBD. It's like an orange that's been sitting in the bottom of the fruit bowl for a year then dipped in shit.

Shand said...

Here come the haters.
You wish you had the chance to have Mr Meadows shooting one of your crap scripts, mate. Same for Orange. You wish.

Anonymous said...

"Asda could have been done by any agency in town, including Grey on an off day"

Maybe but Meadows would never have agreed working with any of them.

TGOOT said...

Look, for all the idiots out there who think that getting Meadows is like getting Spielberg or Scorsese, it's not. He'll take the shilling from anyone for any old shit script. If you think he gives the first fuck about Fallon, you are sorely mistaken. He likes the cash to finance his proper work, so he just tosses off rubbish like Asda in his spare time. Check out his crap for McD's and Quorn.

http://www.tomboy-films.co.uk/director.asp?dirID=1

And Orange...you really don't want to start defending that, do you? Really?

]-[appy Thought said...

I'd like to add that all these points are just as valid for online 'books' too. As a digital creative we get lots of Emails from people asking us to check out their work online during a lunchbreak, which we try to oblige them with, but if it falls down on any of Scamp's finger points then we're reaching for the Stumble button and it won't get passed on to our ACD, or CD, or ECD or another type of CD we can invent.

Digital books can work though, a dude sent us his work just on a bLogger page and it was great so we sent it to our superiors. He's on placement now. Just remember there is a difference between a bLog of work and a bLog about trying to get work!

Anonymous said...

It's good advice but the remark about long copy makes me sad. Scamp, you're a creative director and have time to read thousands of words of blog comments every day, most of which are inconsequential. Yet you wouldn't look at a long copy portfolio ad to see if a candidate to be a writer is able to write at length.

Scamp said...

I didn't say that I personally wouldn't read it. But I know that most CD's wouldn't. So at best it's a waste of a page in a book.

Anonymous said...

scamp, what about headhunters? are they a complete waste of time for placement teams? i never found them very useful, but perhaps i didn't know how to play them properly?

Anonymous said...

my girlfriend (a civilian) watched the orange ad and said "what's that got to do with me?"

sums it up for me.

Claußen said...

Thank you Simon.

Anonymous said...

That's fair enough. But you want to work with a creative director who likes the stuff that you like doing, right? Your book helps employers select you but it also helps you select employers.

Scamp said...

What CD likes in real world is different to what he likes in book. For real world ad, important client, possible awards for agency, he will read your long copy idea. In book world, when he has six other books to go through, he will skip the long copy.

Exception: CD at DM agency in small town in Gloucestershire will read your long copy ad. Maybe.

small-town Gloucs DM CD said...

Fuck off will I.

Anonymous said...

Hmm. even if that's true I don't know if I agree with the advice. A long copy ad can be obviously effective without being read -- you can often judge e.g. the headline, artwork and strategy pretty much in an instant. The quality of the writing itself becomes a mere executional detail. I don't know though, maybe it's just dispiriting for a person to be told that what he thinks is his greatest strength (long copy) is not going to be factored into whether he gets an interview or not.

Mona said...

Ah yess. Hmmm Ahhhh. I see what you mean there anonymous.

So many wannabe creatives (myself included)are writing these really boring comments just to get noticed by professionals.

(Tomorrow I am gonna see if the number of hits on my blog changes as a result of this obnoxious comment!)

Anonymous said...

Scamp - everything you say is true if it's a bad or average long copy ad. But not if it's a genius long copy ad.

And you don't have to spend five minutes working out if it's a genius long copy ad. You know as soon as you see the genius headline. Which takes as much time to process (if not less) than a visual pun.

And remember there are plenty of purely visual ads out there that take an investment of time and attention before the penny drops - there's just as much chance of a hassled CD flicking past one of those without realising its inherent genius.

It's not about copy or visuals, it's just about good or bad.

Anonymous said...

ummm

Anonymous said...

this is really boring. more boring than the orange ad.

Anonymous said...

I saw the script for that Orange ad a month before it came out and it was much more interesting. Quite moving in fact.

So what the frigg happened? Did the good bits get lost in the editing? Did the client intervene? Did it get cut from a 60 to a 30?

I've seen the script for the next one though and it's much much much more interesting.

Anonymous said...

And will also be shit.

Anonymous said...

Such bitterness!

cosmoticentity said...

Wow. We really are parasites, sucking the life out of talented old Scamp. We should congratualte ourselves and partay! Whoop whoop.

(she says in the hope that she will break her record of blog readers today)...

cosmoticentity said...

Cummon guys- I'm waiting to experience a bitchy whiney come-back for my transparent attempt to beg/borrow/steal PR for my own blog.

Show some wrath!!!! Say somthing cutting and original ( like always..)

I'm waiting...

cosmoticentity said...

oh and don't slag off my poor grammar. I wasn't taught it at skool. I was born in the 1980s.

Anonymous said...

100! YES!

George said...

Here's a thought. Off topic, but quite interesting I think.

Scamp, which posts have been most commented on. I remember the Transport for London dancing bear got loads of attention, plus the release of the Bud ads from Fallon ('oh my god, we are all dead'). What are the others?

Anonymous said...

Do some research and tailor your book to the agency/CD. You've got to learn to whore yourself, you'll be doing it once you get the job anyway.

Scamp said...

George -

1st place Dave Trott Live Chat 246 comments

2nd place Bud campaign discussion 232

3rd place Dothetest controversy 229

tgoot said...

Final proof that Fallon has lost it: check out their new fruity sweets ad, shot by Tom Kuntz, on David Reviews.

Dear lord it is so shit it makes Orange Biker look like Guinness Surfer and Asda Tug-of-War look like Honda Cog.

(It's fucking awful. No exaggeration or joke).

Anonymous said...

Anon 12:13 PM
who the fuck are you then? Juan Cabral? Or just a fallon junior peeking over other people's scripts?
If you're a junior -specially if you did ASDA- and you think it's good, we should expect the opposite.

tgoot, you've got to be joking.
NOTHING could make that Asda thing feel like cog.

Anonymous said...

what about having a really flashy book?

I saw a junior team that spent lots of money doing a book up to make them look professional.

Aparently, the more expensive the book, the better you look.

But what happens if the ads in it are shit?

Doesn;t this make you look like you've got your priority wrong?

Anonymous said...

4:53 PM
what are you on? no fallon sweets ad on david reviews.

Anonymous said...

put fallon in the search. It's the second ad down.

So shit I want to firebomb the agency.

Anonymous said...

don't know what u're talking about.
second ad is Flower comparison

Ad Broad, oldest working writer in advertising said...

As a serial freelancer (placement to you) I've submitted my book countless times and can assure that this advice holds not just for juniors--The Finger is the Arbiter of GrownUp books, too. One question, though. In case I ever go for a job over there. What's an ambient ad, Scamp? The imagination runs riot...

Anonymous said...

i think ultimately its all good and well.

but you have to do your own thing.

ads, not ads. do whatever you want. see people whos work you respect. they will guide you.

ld school is all good and well. but there are thousands can do that. and better than you.

what news with you?

Scamp said...

Ambient ad = ad in the surrounding environment, e.g. ads on park benches, coffee cups, the pavement etc