Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Tuesday Tip No. 24 - Don’t Be Afraid To Ask


When you’re a junior and you’re in the process of making an ad, whether it be TV, radio or print, and you’re sitting in a sound/editing/retouching studio, it's easy to feel pressured into saying ‘yes that’s looking good’, when your inner voice is thinking, ‘hmmm... i’m not sure... something doesn't feel right.’

Just come out and say it. Even if you’re not sure what’s wrong, it's better to register your concern there and then, rather than let it go. Because if you don’t, it’ll niggle at you, and you may regret it later.

And quite often... that little inner voice is right.

Thanks to RM for this one

Tip No.23 - Your Idea Has To Be 120%
Tip No.22 - Read Iain's Tips
Tip No.21 - Don't Behave
Tip No.20 - How To Discuss Ideas
Tip No.19 - Read Hugh's Tips
Tip No.18 - How To Get A Job In Advertising Part IV - How To Turn A Placement Into A Job
Tip No.17 - How To Get A Job In Advertising Part III - How To Approach Agencies (re-print of Tip No. 7)
Tip No.16 - How To Get A Job In Advertising Part II - How To Put A Book Together
Tip No. 15 - How To Get A Job In Advertising Part I - FAQ
Tip No. 14 - Make Friends With Traffic
Tip No. 13 - Get Reference
Tip No. 12 - Don't Stop Too Soon
Tip No.11 - Be Very
Tip No.10 - Breaking Up
Tip No.9 - Working Well With Your Partner
Tip No.8 - Finding The Right Partner
Tip No.7 - How To Approach Agencies
Tip No.6 - Never-Seen-Before Footage
Tip No.5 - Dicketts' Finger
Tip No.4 - Two Blokes In The Pub
Tip No.3 - Play Family Fortunes
Tip No.2 - Should You Take A Bad Job?
Tip No.1 - Don't Overpolish

3 comments:

Cleaver said...

It's a hard thing to do, because in asking a question you're admitting to your own ignorance, and nobody likes to look dumb.

But if you don't ask questions you don't extend your knowledge or challenge your own preconceptions, which is what this industry is supposed to be all about.

The New Yorker ran an article on Osama Bin Laden a couple of years ago in which they interviewed a bunch his old classmates. They remembered him as a really intelligent guy who lacked the confidence to speak up in classand question things.

Perhaps I'm being trite, but it strikes me as a fairly good cautionary tale on the way an unwillingness to look ignorant can harden into dogma.

Anonymous said...

"Perhaps I'm being trite, but it strikes me as a fairly good cautionary tale on the way an unwillingness to look ignorant can harden into dogma."

Understatement/misguided conclusion of the year.

Toad said...

Moving away from Osama..

Two points:

1. You may well get dinged for not speaking up. From your CD who asks you why you let the mistake go, for instance. Or doesn't ask and just mentally notes that you didn't do the kind of job s/he was hoping.

2. These things do haunt you. I remember hearing Ed McCabe speak at The One Club back when they used to do those sorts of things, and he said that when he looks at his famous old ads all he sees are the things he wishes he'd done differently. And while I'm not nearly as famous, his comment struck a nerve: I'm guilty of the same thing. But I think any creative with pride in his/her work is.