Monday, June 23, 2014

What Happens In Cannes, No Longer Stays In Cannes


Cannes used to be shrouded in mystique. But today, you can read dozens of blogs every day, about everything that goes on.

It used to be that you could only see all this incredible work from all around the world, if you actually went there. Now, you can see it on the website.

It used to be that you'd have to 'imagine' what these boat parties and villa parties looked like, unless you actually went. Now you see them all over Facebook and Instagram.

It used to be that you could only hear the speakers if you went. Now, they're all online too.

And it used to be that you couldn't even go to Cannes unless you were a Creative, or a production company person, whereas it's now full of Suits, Clients... even Kanye West gets to go. 

So today's Cannes is actually a lot more democratic and public than it used to be.

The inspirational elements - the great work, the thought-leadership talks - are more widely shared than ever before.

And so is the fun.
 
The effect of this more public Cannes? To create more irritation and jealousy, for sure. But also, I reckon, to make us more highly motivated - more determined to have either the great work, or the influence, that will get us there next year. And that, mes amis, is surely a good thing.

12 comments:

Old CD Guy said...

Cannes used to be truly exciting, something you really looked forward to, followed every twist and turn and hoovered up every little skerrick of information, particularly who won what.

Now it's just 'meh'.

isn't it interesting... said...

...that most of the CB Cannes coverage has barely any comments?

@ Old CD Guy said...


You can't be that old if you're using the word 'meh'. Give yourself a slap in the face. Or change your name to 'Young Creative Hack masquerading as Old CD Guy' and then slap yourself in the face for good measure. Because if there's one person who thinks they're cooler than an adolescent riding a skateboard with his hat on backwards while wearing baggy jeans it's a young person pretending to be an old person who uses the word 'meh'. It's not even a word. It's just dumb.

You know it makes sense.

Scamp said...

@isn't it interesting

I dunno if that's a sign that people aren't interested in Cannes, if such is what you're implying? Not every blog post has to be a polemic that causes a raging debate. Surely a bit of simple reportage is okay too?

Sell! Sell! said...

NOT SURE IF SERIOUS...

Anonymous said...

I feel the exact opposite. The more I see of Cannes, the less I want to go.

Anonymous said...

For me Cannes is a bit Marmite. You know. I can take it or leave it. Not really bothered either way about it.

Anonymous said...

Cannes? I take the C. I take the n. I take the s. I add u. I add t. I end up with Ctnuts.

Anonymous said...

It could be about being more democratic.

It could be about being more fun.

It could be about the $26 million they made this year.

I know which one I'd go with.

Anonymous said...

I started in advertising 4 months ago. I miss work that sells the product, that actually builds brands (I'm a copywriter). For whatever reason, I don't understand most of the stuff that is being shown in Cannes. Maybe I'm too simple, maybe I'm too stupid. However, from what I've seen, I often wonder: why would I express an interest as a punter in what I see. I can't find any good reason in many of the things shown there. It shows me WHAT it is, but it lacks in many cases the WHY. What's in it for me as a punter? What's the product benefit? I miss this kind of thing. Advertising that contains wit, that solves a business problem. In the meanwhile we give clients what they want, let's not work our ass off making brilliant ads for the real world, let's make some ads the clients want. Branding, gadgets, apps. All the answers before the real question has been asked: what's the business problem? Let's not fight for a better solution. Let's just give 'em the usual rubbish. And when Cannes is up again, we'll make some ads that will serve not the punter, but the advertising industry. It's kinda funny: In the real world it often doesn't sell, because nobody wants to fight with the client, and in the awards world it sells to an audience that isn't even a real audience.

Scamp said...

Yup, very true. We seem to be creating a weird duality in our industry, of exactly the type you describe.

Sell! Sell! said...

Hey Anonymous 10:32 PM, we should talk.