Tuesday, March 24, 2009

When Real People Critique Adverts




This is a new viral for Stella, created by Mother, that remakes '24' in the style of 1960s French film director Jean-Luc Godard.

Other ads in the campaign feature Bruce Deville playing Jean Meqlain in "Dial Hard", and "8 Kilometre", in which two duelling literati face off in a war of words in a French jazz club.

I thought they were quite nice.

But on the Guardian Media website, comments from the public include:

"Has the credit crunch taken the talent out of advertising?" (this from kranl).

bumfight reckons: "That has to be the lamest spoof every made. It's also the laziest. And it's about as 'funny' as rectal cancer."

"Dreadful," reckons hitandrun. "The Truffaut one is quite impossible to watch till the end unless you're a severe masochist."

Crikey. And they say ad blogs are bitchy.

A useful reminder, I suppose, that we live in a bubble, within which "the latest new work from Mother" is very interesting. But outside of which, it's just so much more pollution.

47 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wood. Trees.
The Guardian seems to attract some pretty harsh comments in general, but it's best to listen to the non-experts. After all they might buy beer.

The Voice of Reason said...

I think the general public have got this spot on...it's a load of self indulgent tosh.

Anonymous said...

Come back Lowe - if there's anyone left - all is forgiven...

Anonymous said...

Scamp, sure Mother did them? I read that they were created by 'Poke'.

Anonymous said...

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't Stella Artois from Belgium, not France..?

Anonymous said...

Real Mothers don't like Mother.

Ewarwoowar said...

Post commentators seem to increasingly harbour uncontrollable angst or stupidity. That's why this is so much fun: http://ifyoulikeitsomuchwhydontyougolivethere.com/

simon said...

I'm not so sure you differ from the guardian readers when you describe them as, "quite nice".

Not even nice, but "quite nice". God help you once Robert and Mark have tracked you down

George said...

I like them.
They are very well observed, understated and funny.

Sell! Sell! said...

Real people are the only real critics of adverts.
They judge by what they do.
Yeah, we in the business can say what we think is good, but the real judge of advertising is what happens when it hits the public.
Do they react/act/do what we intended the work to get them to do?
If yes - good. If not - bad. Sorry.

Anonymous said...

Why do you live in a bubble? You're in advertising for Christ's sake. How can you be in advertising and live in a bubble? No wonder clients have lost faith in ad agencies.

Phil said...

Three problems here:

People who drink Stella probably don't give a shite about French New Wave.

It's not funny.

It's not a "viral" unless it spreads virally. At 204 views it's a "video".

Hazell said...

It doesn't make me want to drink Stella and, to be fair, I'm an easy sell.

Anonymous said...

Question: Will this film help them sell anymore beer?

Answer: No it won't, and I can't see it does a decent branding job either.

I'm also pretty sure it is Poke and not Mother who are behind these shocking efforts.

Anonymous said...

"Real People" critique ads on YouTube, not The Guardian blog. The latter is usually populated by disgruntled media folk and is hardly a fair representation of society. That said, the ads are a bit smelly.

Anonymous said...

Contrary to what the Adland 'Bible' says, they're definitely Mother's work

Anonymous said...

It's as funny as being bummed with a baseball bat covered in nails. And razor blades.

Matt said...

We don't live in a bubble, but it seems that some agencies do. We can't TELL people that a campaign is great.

Sergio Zyman commented a while back on the 'Emperor's New Clothes' syndrome in advertising. A big name agency creates a campaign for a big name brand and people feel the ought to love it, until someone steps up and is brave enough to tell the truth.

I'm glad to see a backlash. I'm reminded Scamp of a comment that you made about the Mr Strings spot. You stated, 'And if you don't know why it's good, I can't help you.'

That's a bullshit remark. Personally I didn't like it. It did nothing for me and I'm sure a lot of people shared my opinion.

I think it's about time people start judging advertising on what they see in front of them; not who was involved, or who the agency was. The general public couldn't give a fuck about that and rightly so.

Also, the Duffy Diet Coke campaign is the worse thing on TV at the minute.

Iain Tait said...

Dear Anonymous(es)

The films were 100% created by Mother.

There is a story going around that we 'realeased them' as virals - I think that means putting them onto the internets. Which we did do.

I work at Poke and there's no way we could claim credit for the films.

Anonymous said...

Seems to be a bit of confusion over the target audience.

Someone needs to tell the agency that 'Wife beater' is now the favourite tipple of chavs and townies. It hasn't been a high brow beer for years...

Anonymous said...

I think film writing is never as easy as it seems, Mother needs some amazing story that could win Oscar, that probably might work. I don't really like the film, is bit dull for me.

G

Anonymous said...

Sergio Zyman commented a while back on the 'Emperor's New Clothes' syndrome in advertising. A big name agency creates a campaign for a big name brand and people feel the ought to love it, until someone steps up and is brave enough to tell the truth.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

matt, just so you know you're quoting the guy who brought us polar bears for coca cola. hardly a high point for the brand.

most advertising can't compete with actually interesting/funny content out there. and doesn't even try.

this stella stuff sounds like film wankery to me. pastiches/hommages/parodies have no life of their own. don't bother doing them.

Anonymous said...

mother really do think they're bunch of filmmakers don't they. This is lazy wank

Anonymous said...

THE LONGEST 73 SECONDS IN MY LIFE!!! SHIT

Anonymous said...

Anyone know who shot them?

john w. said...

C'est nul à chier.

Anonymous said...

Agustin Alberdi - a young director who has just signed for Stink. He's from Argentina with a company called Landia. I don't work for Stink, but I just happen to know a bit about the him.

Anonymous said...

I'm assuming C'est nul à chier. means shit?

john w. said...

Anon -5:25 PM
C'est nul à chier - It is a load of pants.
I was trying to be facetious.

brake dollinge said...

nearly all of us write adverts for other people who work in advertising. if you think you don't, you're very probably kidding yourselves.

after all, todd q taxpayer is only bothered about what gives him the least amount of grief between part 2 and part 3, or if that feller in that one with the crocodile in it was in gavin & stacey.

we want people to appreciate the strategic insight or listen to our indignant war stories about how long it took to get that jump cut through the client.

neither's wrong, we just consume them in different ways, and maybe once in a powder-blue moon the twain shall meet.

people only ever care about TV ads, too (maybe the odd poster every five years if it's got a pair of tits on it or something) - I think that's significant.

jingwei said...

I laughed a lot more at the trailers than at the actual short films.

As advertising this is probably too self-indulgent for Ted E Everyone to care.

But I like these, not because they're bad advertising, but because they made me smile.

And Jacques Baudeur made me laugh.

Matt said...

@ Anonymous 4:22 PM

I'm aware of who I'm quoting.

Again like all of us, his output varies in quality and I don't agree with all he says. However, his point was and is still relevant. Especially in this context.

@ brake dollinge

'nearly all of us write adverts for other people who work in advertising.'

Very true. Do people actually give a fuck about the intricacies of a campaign? Strategies, planning, craft, etc. It reminds me of this article:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2009/feb/03/dairycrestgroup-sexpistols

This seems to have won over the general public, but I doubt any of us would say it's a great campaign.

In the end the success of a campaign depends on the public.

Anonymous my bollocks said...

Agustin Alberdi has shot some amazing stuff in the past. Vh1's parents day is just fucking brilliant.

http://www.landia.com/directores/agustin-alberdi/index.html

Now, if an argie director was called for this I can only assume Agusto & Gustavo wrote these. Good guys. Sadly, not their finest hour.

And you know what they say, when it comes to argies, there's only Juan.

Anonymous said...

I'd prefer to see agencies like mother than almost every other one that continues to pollute our world with the insulting nonsense I watch 99% of the time.
Granted Mother aren't going to get it right all the time. But isn't it funny how people are so quick to jump down the throat of a place that has consistently churned out work of a higher standard than almost every other agency out there.
Why would you want to do that?
Unless you were really bitter of course.

pete said...

It's ok. I think all those public commentors are crap at their job too.

]-[appy Thought said...

I liked the Coca Cola polar bears...

Anonymous said...

i have to say, i agree with all the comments.
And who's to say that these comments weren't from admen masquerading as real people

Anonymous said...

@ matt.

The success of the campaign relies on sales my friend. After all, thats what we are in this industry for. Mother have unearthed a prime example of when peep's get it twisted and try to avoid this fact.

craigology said...

Yep, listen to the public, they are after all our target market. The problem we face is this- "We" ad folk, like ads, we like them because we spend our work hours making them.
Most people (the public) don't like ads because they are intrusive and unsolicited. The public have a different view to ads because they have lives to lead, jobs to do and families to feed. Their main concern isn't to stop and look at the work we find so brilliant. Their concern is, well, their OWN concerns.
If you make someone laugh or inform them in a new, inspiring way, they will warm to you. If you don't do this you'll get their back up for being annoying and intrusive! So when the public air their view, listen to them, it's they who buy the products we shove in front of them via every given media these days, and if we're going to do, we better start listening to what they say about their likes and dislikes!

As the old saying goes: "The consumer isn't a moron; she is your wife!"

Anonymous said...

As the old saying goes: "The consumer isn't a moron; she is your wife!"


...But my wife IS a moron!

Anonymous said...

It does baffle me somewhat that our industry is so self congratulatory. We have Cannes, D&AD, BTAA, Creative Circle, Midsummers, Epica, Meribel, APA50, Campaign BIG, and a whole host of other awards shows - none of which award effectiveness. They are awarded just because we like the ads.

If effectiveness was held in such a high regard by those that work in the industry, then Currys, Tesco, Diet Coke and B&Q would be picking up the awards.

I know there are the IPA effectiveness awards, but does anyone other than the client really pay any attention to them?

Anonymous said...

Never met a decent creative who'd admit in private to caring about selling shit. We just say so when there are clients within earshot. We all just like fucking around making ads.

element404 said...

Hummm, I was going to send it to my flatmate who loves those sorts of films (he's a director). I thought he'd think they were cool, then i watched them and thought maybe he wouldn't.
I think the problem is the url at the end, it makes it marketing fodder that everyone hates as opposed to funny films everyone loves.

Anonymous said...

I'll have a Fosters, thanks.

Anonymous said...

we're paid for the awards we win. Not for the beer we sell. Also, as people with at least a grain of creativity, it's pretty soul destroying working in the pettyest, shallowest most infantile industry imaginable - Of course we want to try to make something just a little bit "interesting" (or maybe just pretentious). Plus, as Sid Vicious said when asked why he didn't make music for the man in the street - "I've met the man in the street and he's a cunt."

Richard said...

that's why they are not TV ads, but intended to find their own audience - isn't that what a viral does

Anonymous said...

Did Lenny Henry write these?
Utter purile shit.